Archive for the ‘entepreneurship’ Category

 

During this segment, Kalika was paired with a “protege” in a similar field – Beverly Harris owner of Beverly Harris Weddings & Events. Beverly is a start-up company that needs help and advise on various topics such as growing, funding, selling, or marketing their business. Kalika gave her recommendations on how to better improve her business.

Business Rockstar’s Mentoring segment is designed to give the listeners insight on the challenges of having a start-up company and how to overcome them.

Kalika Yap

Business Rockstars

Kalika Yap with host Ken Rutkowski and “protege” Beverly Harris of Beverly Harris Weddings & EventsBusiness RockstarsYou can listen to the episode here.

 

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NAWBO_WebBanner_29Jan2013

This year’s 2nd annual entrepreneur’s conference, ‘Bacon Donuts: Practical Planning for Brilliantly Risky Ideas”  is dedicated to a subject that speaks to the hearts and minds of all successful entrepreneurs – thinking creatively and acting pragmatically.

On the panel 1: Money Morning is our CEO Kalika Yap with Sasha Strauss, Managing Director of Innovation Protocol and Marty Metro, Founder of UsedCardboardBoxes.com. Moderated by Jean C. del Rosario, VP/Sr. Portfolio Managment Office, Consumer and Business Lending, Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

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Marty Metro, Jean C. del Rosario, Kalika Yap and Sasha Strauss

Right after the conference held the annual NAWBO-LA Awards Luncheon, celebrating it’s 27th year of giving tribute to top achievers among womenleaders who have established a legacy of entrepreneurial excellence and contributed significantly to Southern California.

This year’s conference and luncheon was held at the J.W. Marriott at LA. Live last Friday, April 26, 2013.

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CEO Kalika Yap with the Citrus girls

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Pooneh Mohajer, COO and Co-Founder of Tokidoki

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Barbara Lazaroff, ASID, President, Imaginings Design, Inc./ Founder, Spago, Chinois & WP Fine Dining, Catering & Worldwide

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 LL Cool J introducing his wife Simone for the Rising Star award

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Congratulations to the 2013 honorees!

Leadership Award: Jessica Iclisoy, Founder & President, California Baby

Legacy Award: Barbara Lazaroff, ASID, President, Imaginings Design, Inc./ Founder, Spago, Chinois & WP Fine Dining, Catering & Worldwide

Trailblazer of the Year Award: Pooneh Mohajer, Co-Founder & COO, tokidoki

Rising Star of the Year Award: Simone I. Smith, Designer & Co-Owner, Simone I. Smith

Innovator of the Year Award: Gwynne Shotwell, President, SpaceX

Hall of Fame Inductee: Jeri Harman, Founder & Partner, Avante Mezzanine Partners

Man of the Year Award: Noel Massie, UPS District President, UPS

Kalika Yap on Kababayan LA, Channel 18

Kalika Yap’s interview with Janelle So of Kababayan LA, talking about successful business entrepreneurship.

Kababayan LA is America’s first and only daily talk show for and about the Filipinos.

You can watch the full interview here

 

 

via inc.com/Geoffrey James

The best managers have a fundamentally different understanding of workplace, company, and team dynamics. See what they get right.

A few years back, I interviewed some of the most successful CEOs in the world in order to discover their management secrets. I learned that the “best of the best” tend to share the following eight core beliefs.

1. Business is an ecosystem, not a battlefield.

Average bosses see business as a conflict between companies, departments and groups. They build huge armies of “troops” to order about, demonize competitors as “enemies,” and treat customers as “territory” to be conquered.

Extraordinary bosses see business as a symbiosis where the most diverse firm is most likely to survive and thrive. They naturally create teams that adapt easily to new markets and can quickly form partnerships with other companies, customers … and even competitors.

2. A company is a community, not a machine.

Average bosses consider their company to be a machine with employees as cogs. They create rigid structures with rigid rules and then try to maintain control by “pulling levers” and “steering the ship.”

Extraordinary bosses see their company as a collection of individual hopes and dreams, all connected to a higher purpose. They inspire employees to dedicate themselves to the success of their peers and therefore to the community–and company–at large.

3. Management is service, not control.

Average bosses want employees to do exactly what they’re told. They’re hyper-aware of anything that smacks of insubordination and create environments where individual initiative is squelched by the “wait and see what the boss says” mentality.

Extraordinary bosses set a general direction and then commit themselves to obtaining the resources that their employees need to get the job done. They push decision making downward, allowing teams form their own rules and intervening only in emergencies.

4. My employees are my peers, not my children.

Average bosses see employees as inferior, immature beings who simply can’t be trusted if not overseen by a patriarchal management. Employees take their cues from this attitude, expend energy on looking busy and covering their behinds.

Extraordinary bosses treat every employee as if he or she were the most important person in the firm. Excellence is expected everywhere, from the loading dock to the boardroom. As a result, employees at all levels take charge of their own destinies.

5. Motivation comes from vision, not from fear.

Average bosses see fear–of getting fired, of ridicule, of loss of privilege–as a crucial way to motivate people.  As a result, employees and managers alike become paralyzed and unable to make risky decisions.

Extraordinary bosses inspire people to see a better future and how they’ll be a part of it.  As a result, employees work harder because they believe in the organization’s goals, truly enjoy what they’re doing and (of course) know they’ll share in the rewards.

6. Change equals growth, not pain.

Average bosses see change as both complicated and threatening, something to be endured only when a firm is in desperate shape. They subconsciously torpedo change … until it’s too late.

Extraordinary bosses see change as an inevitable part of life. While they don’t value change for its own sake, they know that success is only possible if employees and organization embrace new ideas and new ways of doing business.

7. Technology offers empowerment, not automation.

Average bosses adhere to the old IT-centric view that technology is primarily a way to strengthen management control and increase predictability. They install centralized computer systems that dehumanize and antagonize employees.

Extraordinary bosses see technology as a way to free human beings to be creative and to build better relationships. They adapt their back-office systems to the tools, like smartphones and tablets, that people actually want to use.

8. Work should be fun, not mere toil.

Average bosses buy into the notion that work is, at best, a necessary evil. They fully expect employees to resent having to work, and therefore tend to subconsciously define themselves as oppressors and their employees as victims. Everyone then behaves accordingly.

Extraordinary bosses see work as something that should be inherently enjoyable–and believe therefore that the most important job of manager is, as far as possible, to put people in jobs that can and will make them truly happy.

via inc.com

 

The National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO-LA) 26th Annual NAWBO-LA Leadership and Legacy Awards Luncheon was held at the J.W. Marriott at LA. Live last Friday, March 23, 2012.

The NAWBO-LA Awards aim to give deserved tribute to top achievers and advocates in the women’s business community and recognize their contributions to the advancement of women.

Magic Johnson, Max Azria both made special appearances to present their gorgeous, lovely wives awards. Cookie Johnson, received the Rising Star Award (which Kalika received in 2012).

Max Azria and Lubov Azria of BCBGMAXAZRIAGROUP

Earvin "Magic" Johnson Chairman and CEO of Magic Johnson Enterprises, Cookie Johnson the Founder & Co-Owner of CJ by Cookie Johnson

Kalika with EO Online guru, Stephen Jagger

with the NY Times best selling author of Tribal Leadership, Dr. Dave Logan

Congratulations to the 2012 honorees!

LEADERSHIP AWARD
Lubov Azria
Chief Creative Officer, BCBGMAXAZRIAGROUP

LEGACY AWARD
Frieda Rapoport Caplan
Founder & Chairman of the Board, Frieda’s Inc.

RISING STAR OF THE YEAR
Cookie Johnson
Founder & Co-Owner, CJ by Cookie Johnson

DIVERSITY CHAMPION AWARD
Byron Reed
Senior Vice President, Wells Fargo

HALL OF FAME INDUCTEE
Patricia Watts
President/CEO, FCI Management Consultants

INNOVATOR OF THE YEAR AWARD
Julie Schoenfeld
CEO, Perfect Market, Inc.

TRAILBLAZER AWARD
Luisa Acosta-Franco
Head of Specialized Distribution, Farmers Insurance Group

 

Here’s a Thank you letter from Ari A. Matusiak, Executive Director of the White House Business Council for the participants of Urban Economic Forum.

Friends –

On behalf of all of us in the Administration, I want to send a quick note to thank you for taking the time to participate in the Urban Economic Forum this past Thursday and for making it the program it was.  We heard positive feedback throughout the day and are still receiving emails from attendees, glowingly recapping all they learned.  While they may have our email addresses, you are the ones they are really writing to. 

We know how busy you all are.  Thank you again for being a part of the day.  We look forward to staying in touch and to the opportunity to work together again some time soon.

I trust this finds all of you well.

Best, Ari

Ari A. Matusiak
Executive Director
White House Business Council
(202) 456-6809 (o)
(202) 503-5542 (m)

 

The White House Urban Economic Forum took place in Los Angeles on Thursday, March 22nd on the campus of Loyola Marymount University. The day long event focused on Urban Entrepreneurs, Small Businesses, Emerging Businesses and High Growth Businesses.  Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa opened the forum and Earvin Magic Johnson lead one of the early panel discussions on Urban Entrepreneurs. The event profiled Urban Entrepreneurs, explored investing in Urban Entrepreneurs, discussed how to start and fund businesses and the use of Social Media to grow your business.

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa
Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images North America

Chairman and CEO of Magic Johnson Enterprises, Earvin "Magic" Johnson
Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images North America

Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images North America

Kalika participated in the Technology and Social Media Action Workshop along with:

Todd Park, Chief Technology Officer, White House
Russel Buetow, Microsoft
Charles Lee, CEO, Ideation     
Albert Cheng, Google  

 

via Inc.com

By Eric Schurenberg

This classic 25-word definition pares entrepreneurship to its essence and explains why it’s so hard. And so addictive.

As an entrepreneur, you surely have an elevator pitch, the pithy 15-second synopsis of what your company does and why, and you can all but repeat it in your sleep. But until recently, I’d never seen a good elevator pitch for entrepreneurship itself—that is, what you do that all entrepreneurs do?

Now I’ve seen it, and it comes from Harvard Business School, of all places. It was conceived 37 years ago by HBS professor Howard Stevenson. I came across it in the book Breakthrough Entrepreneurship (which I highly recommend) by entrepreneur and teacher Jon Burgstone and writer Bill Murphy, Jr. Of Stevenson’s definition, Burgstone says, “people often need to say it out loud 50 or 100 times before they really understand what it means.” Here it is:

 Entrepreneurship is the pursuit of opportunity without regard to resources currently controlled.

I talked to Stevenson about his classic definition this weekend. Back in 1983, he told me, people tended to define entrepreneurship almost as a personality disorder, a kind of risk addiction. “But that didn’t fit the entrepreneurs I knew,” he said. “I never met an entrepreneur who got up in the morning saying ‘Where’s the most risk in today’s economy, and how can I get some? Most entrepreneurs I know are looking to lay risk off—on investors, partners, lenders, and anyone else.” As for personality, he said, “The entrepreneurs I know are all different types. They’re as likely to be wallflowers as to be the wild man of Borneo.”

By focusing on entrepreneurship as a process, his definition opened the term to all kinds of people. Plus, it matched the one demographic fact HBS researchers already knew about entrepreneurs—they were more likely to start out poor than rich. “They see an opportunity and don’t feel constrained from pursuing it because they lack resources,” says Stevenson. “They’re used to making do without resources.”

The perception of opportunity in the absence of resources helps explain much of what differentiates entrepreneurial leadership from that of corporate administrators: the emphasis on team rather than hierarchy, fast decisions rather than deliberation, and equity rather than cash compensation.

What would you expect, asks Stevenson: When you don’t have the cash to boss people around, like in a corporation, you have to create a more horizontal organization. “You hire people who want what you have and not what you don’t have,” Stevenson says. In other words, entrepreneurs offer their team members a larger share of a vision for a future payoff, rather than a smaller share of the meager resources at hand. Opportunity is the only real resource you have.

Or, as Burgstone puts it:

Every time you want to make any important decision, there are two possible courses of action. You can look at the array of choices that present themselves, pick the best available option and try to make it fit. Or, you can do what the true entrepreneur does: Figure out the best conceivable option and then make it available.

And that, folks, is what makes entrepreneurship so friggin’ hard. And so friggin’ necessary.